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of congress, including senator patrick leahy of vermont. >> i want to know if -- whether it's n.s.a. or anybody else that's made a mistake, we ought to know that. if they're tapping into people's telephones where they have no right to, we ought to know that. >> reporter: almost 20 billions are already pending in congress to limit the surveillance program, to protect american calls and e-mails, and to ins the n.s.a. reports to
fisa court, ordered the agency to destroy. the n.s.a. argues that the number of privacy violations is tiny compared to the 20 million data searches done every month in the hunt for terrorists. n.s.a. compliance director john delong told reporters by phone: t mistakes are routinely disclosed to the fisa court, to the justice department and to congress. >> .
these people in the n.s.a. are patriots. probably what has annoyed me the most over the last several months is people casually using words like "spying," "snooping." does anybody think general alexander wants to snoop on america? i think that demeans the whole political dialogue and that's why i wish the president would be more outgoing and defend the n.s.a. a lot more than he did. this has really bane sland or the thousand of good men and women who every day dedicate their thrives our country and particularly general alexander, who is as patriotic as anyone i have ever met in government or
government? in what way? >> reporter: i hear you clearly. you're saying whatever the n.s.a. is doing is okay with me. >> it's great. it's essential. by the way president obama thinks it's essential. it's essential if we want to minimize the kind of strikes that we just had in boston. it's absolutely essential. >> reporter: at what point would be it be alarming for you in terms of government surveillance?
, this is nearly 3,000 violations, over a one-year period. we should point out the nsa says, though, in a statement, quote, we're a human-run agency operating in a complex environment with a number of different regulatory regimes, so at times we find ourselves on the wrong side of the line. but we have been assured, up and down, both on background with officials and on television, that the proper oversight is in
. is the nsa reading our email? >> yes. they are scanning every email as you type it. >> so as you type it they are scanning it? >> as soon as you send it, it goes through a splitter. there's a fiber optic slipper at the folsom street facility here in san francisco. one copy goes to whoever you're sending it to the other copy
sending it to the other copy goes to the nsa. >> reporter: you're kidding. every email sent? >> since about 2002, yes. >> reporter: how do they have possibly the capacity to store all that stuff and even if they get it how do they figure out what to look at? >> they have the most powerful computers in the world. they are building the biggest data center in the world in utah. this thing is going to store something on the order of x exobites. it's an incredible amount of
and a person reads it if it doesn't they are storing it any way for up to five years and the nsa has this interesting term they use the word collect. they don't collect an email
of the documents from nsa. >> the judge said that the n sa has been lying to the only court that meets in secret has been lying to that court for years and years and the court said it needed to stop. this opinion was from 2011 and we just got it two days ago. >> reporter: so this brings up a question to me. i don't know what you guys think, do we have any privacy at all when you go on the internet? >> from our perspective at the electronic frontier foundation
to keep that email private unless the government comes with a warrant. the nsa has not gotten warrants to read your email and yet they
his case to lawmakers to keep the nsa's spying capabilities alive. >>> major league baseball prepares to hand out suspensions toll more than a dozen players for their involvement in the sport's latest performance-enhancing drug scandal, and the game's highest paid player could be facing a lifetime ban. >>> and george zimmerman surfaces. the neighborhood watch volunteer acquitted of murdering trayvon martin has a minor brush with the law. captioning funded by cbs captioning funded by cbs thursday, august 1st, >>> this is the "cbs morning news" for thursday, august 1st, 2013. good morning. good to be with you. i'm anne-marie green. well, this afternoon, the growing debate over privacy over national security moves to the white house. president obama meets with a bipartisan group of lawmakers to discuss the national security agency's sweeping surveillance program. meanwhile the british paper that first revealed the program has published documents that appear to show the nsa can sift through e-mails, online chats, and browsing histories to just about any american without a warrant. and dur
. the new revelation is an n.s.a. internal audit that shows that the agency is occasionally snooping on phone calls and e-mails of american citizens. no doubt this story will disappoint the president who said this to reassure americans last week. >> all the stories that have been written, what you're not reading about is the government actually abusing these programs and listening in on people's phone calls or inappropriately reading people's e-mails. what you're hearing about is the prospect that these could be abused. now, part of the reason they're not abused is because these checks are in place and those abuses would be against the law. >> pelley: while checks are in place, it turns out mistakes are made. wyatt andrews, now, with the n.s.a. audit just made public. >> reporter: in the audit, the n.s.a. admitted improperly collecting records on americans almost 2, 800 times in the year ending march 30, 2012, the n.s.a. says most but not all of the unauthorized surveillance was unintentional and due to human error, such as typing mistakes, but most of those mistakes resulted in th
king of new york. and the former c.i.a. and n.s.a. director general, michael hayden. plus, what's next for u.s.-russia relations now that the president has canceled his upcoming meeting with president putin? we'll have analysis from raj rajaratnam of the "washington post." eric schmitt of the "new york times." and cbs news state department correspondent margaret brennan. and we'll look at another story that rocked washington, the sale of the "washington post". we'll talk about the future of newspapers with former "washington post" editor len downie. former "new york times" editor bill keller. and john harris, editor in chief of politico. there's a lot to cover, but this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning again, michael hayden who served as both the c.i.a. and n.s.a. director now consulted for the cherdov group here in washington, joins us as our lead guest this morning. general, the president made that news conference on friday, and he said the american people need to know m
had more questions than ever and when the head of the n.s.a. spoke to a cyber security conference he gotten a enexpected reaction from just underlined the growing skepticism about the agency's methods. here's homeland security bobrespondent bob orr. >> how do we defend this country? >> reporter: as n.s.a. chief .eith alexander was defending nge government's data collection ollectms at a cyber security conference in las vegas, he was egasrrupted by hecklers. interrupted by hecklers. >> i haven't lied to congress. >> reporter: intelligence officials are also feeling pressure from a skeptical congress. democrat patrick leahy is the chairman of the senate judiciary committee. >> so what's going to be next? when is enough enough? i think congress has to carefully consider the powerful surveillance tools that we grant to the government. >> reporter: to ease some of the fears, the obama administration today declassified three top- secret documents detailing the n.s.a.'s mass collection of u.s. phone records. a surveillance program first revealed by edward snowden. this is the april, 2013, o
thinks of the n.s.a. surveillance programs. america's newest millionaires tell us what they think of their good fortune. and a mother and child reunion is only a moment or two away. when the cbs evening news continues. continues. the most preferred and the most studied. so when it comes to getting the most out of your multivitamin, the choice is clear. centrum. the choice is clear. with freshly bakedeve in whole grain bread.right then we add all-natural eggs... lean antibiotic-free ham... and vermont white cheddar. get 16 grams of protein and 23 grams of whole grain in the breakfast power sandwich. i took my son fishing every year. we had a great spot, not easy to find, but worth it. but with copd making it hard to breathe, i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function starting within five minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing better. and that means...fish on! symbicort is for copd including chronic bronchitis and emphysema. it should not
. the secret program called x key score details in these classified nsa documents apparently leaked by edward snowden. >> they have multiple ways to get at all your information, phones that you mail, your web browsing. >> reporter: mark klein blew the whistle on the nsa several years ago for mining internet and email records through at&t san francisco office and today with x key score and new technology -- >> they can store a whole dossier on everybody in the country going back years. it's frightening. >> reporter: government surveillance versus privacy took center stage at a talk tonight in oakland. x key score experts say has a massive infrastructure with hundreds of servers around the world. u.s. intelligence officials don't even need your email address to monitor your online activity. the electronic frontier foundation says it's illegal for intelligence agencies to monitor americans without a warrant. >> the government gets access first and then proves that you did something wrong second. it's not supposed to be that way. it's supposed to be the other way around. >> reporter: some say it
this is not a positive development. >> after a month in the moscow airport, nsa leaker edward snowden leaves and disappears. >> it could be the most interesting google search ever setting sail from san francisco for the dead zone. excuse me, sir i'm gonna have to ask you to power down your little word game. i think your friends will understand. oh no, it's actually my geico app...see? ...i just uh paid my bill. did you really? from the plane? yeah, i can manage my policy, get roadside assistance, pretty much access geico 24/7. sounds a little too good to be true sir. i'll believe that when pigs fly. ok, did she seriously just say that? today. karen caifa (kay-fuh) report >>> nsa leaker edward snowden can stay in russia for a year. the country granted him temporary asylum today. karin calf fa reports the white house is not happy. >> reporter: asylum is approved. this is his attorney showing his document. the move ends more than a month of limbo in moscow's airport. snowden has legal status in russia for a year. the white house needless to say was not happy. >> we have extremely disappointed i
from russia granting asylum to n.s.a. leaker edward snowden. >> russia has stabbed us in the back and each day that snowden is allowed to roam free is another twist of the knife. >> schieffer: we'll hear from new york democrat chuck schumer and we'll talk with house budget committee chairman paul ryan. plus analysis from the "washington post's" dan balz, author of the new book "collision 2012." peggy noonan of the "wall street journal." barton gellman of "time" magazine and the "washington post." david sanger of the "new york times," and cbs news political director john dickerson. a lot to cover, but it's what we do on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning again. well, we're getting more details this morning on why the government has closed those 22 american diplomatic posts across the middle east and north africa, and why they are taking so seriously the threat of a possible al qaeda attack. the travel warning that the state department issued last week for americans travelin
. >> there's a chase that mr. snowden now has. what's he going to say? >> nsa leaker edward snowden leaves the moscow airport. >> snowed beden was issued temporary asylum in russia for a year. >> has been holed up at the airport for more than a month. >> if snowden is allowed to stay in russia, the white house is not going to be happy about this. >> ariel castro the cleveland man who held three women captive for a decade will be formerly sentenced today. >> castro prepared to apologize -- >> league officials have told the players union which players -- >> espn reporting alex rodriguez is negotiating a lengthy suspension to avoid a lifetime ban. >> members of congress head to the white house today to voice their concerns about the government's massive surveillance program. >> new information leak, about the nsa's ability to monitor pretty much everything you do online. >> george zimmerman's been spending a little time in texas. >> pulled over outside of texas while carrying a gun. >> what a coincidence. >> overnight, it became legal in two more states for gay co
. protesters declare a day of rage. >>> a new report says the nsa broke privacy rules thousands of times a year. >>> and meet the woman who could become the nfl's first full-time female official. >>> first, this week's "eye opener." your world in 90 seconds. >> you can really feel the tension, the stage is set for more clashes, for more violence. >> egypt braces for a day of rage. thousands of muslim brotherhood supporters pour into the streets. >> authorities have told riot police they can use deadly force to protect themselves and key state institutions. >> our tra diditional cooperati cannot continue when civilians are being killed in the streets. >> "the washington post" found the national security agency breaks privacy rules and oversteps legal boundaries thousands of times a year. >> still a mystery, what cautioned the u.p.s. cargo plane to crash in birmingham? >> federal investigators say there's no evidence the plane was on fire or suffered engine problems. >> a strong earthquake in new zealand this morning. no injuries are being reported. >> a great-grandmother claims bob filner forced
. the nsa may have went too far with its spying program. a federal judge says it misled the cord about its surveillance on americans. that's raising new questions about email privacy. kpix 5's phil matier with nate from the electronic frontier foundation join us. is the nsa reading our email? >> yes. they are scanning every email as you type it. >> so as you type it they are scanning it? >> as soon as you send it, it goes through a splitter. there's a fiber optic slipper at the folsom street facility here in san francisco. one copy goes to whoever you're sending it to the other copy goes to the nsa. >> reporter: you're kidding. every email sent? >> since about 2002, yes. >> reporter: how do they have possibly the capacity to store all that stuff and even if they get it how do they figure out what to look at? >> they have the most powerful computers in the world. they are building the biggest data center in the world in utah. this thing is going to store something on the order of x exobites. it's an incredible amount of computers. >> reporter: your group was part of the release of the doc
's no evidence that the nsa can break this enkripgs. >> google and microsoft have the enkripgs but yahoo and aol do not, and facebook announced today it will. >> interesting stuff. when we first heard about the nsa surveillance going on, we heard about program called prism. now, how is prism different than the x key score. >> that's right. okay. prism is when the nsa targets orders to specific silicon valley companies to get information on specific foreign terror suspects. x key core is much wider in scope. one description that it's like vacuuming a who will room on americans. sharon, thank you for that. >>> new revelations tonight in the case of the three women held hostage for years in the cleveland house. documents show how arielle castro lured them to his basement in the first place. amanda barry, gina dejesus and michelle knight kept diaries. instead they were chained up and raped repeatedly over the years. if he wanteded to punish them, he kept them in the cold basement or the sweltering attic. they got one meal a day and one shower a week. last friday, castro pled guilty to rape, kidnappi
is at the courthouse. bob orr on russia granting asylum to n.s.a. leaker edward snowden. major garrett has white house reaction. that cyclospora outbreak has made hundreds sick, but where is it coming from? >> i don't know what to buy. i don't where to go eat. >> schieffer: dr. jon lapook has the latest on the investigation. and this was a six-year-old when he came to america. this is him now. elaine quijano on how an afghan boy got his childhood back. uijaw captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. this is the "cbs evening news" wi >> schieffer: good evening. scott's on assignment. i'm bob schieffer. three young women were held captive for a decade in a dilapidated cleveland house where they were repeatedly raped and abused. but ariel castro, the man who pleaded guilty to the crime, said today it was everybody's fault but his and claimed the women were actually happy. judge michael russo was not convinced. he sentenced castro to life in prison without parole, plus 1,000 years. dean reynolds is at the courthouse. >> reporter: a shackled ariel castro scanned the cour
these programs as possible. we have already declassified unprecedented information about the nsa. but we can go further. so at my direction the department of justice will make public the legal rational for the government's collection activities under section 215 of the patriot act. the nsa is taking steps to put in place a full-time civil liberties and privacy officer. and released information that details its mission, authorities and oversight. and finally the intelligence community is creating a web site that will serve as a hub for further transparency. and this will give americans and the world the ability to learn more about what our intelligence communities does and what it doesn't do; how it carries out its mission; and why it does so. fourth, we're forming a high-level group of outside experts to review our entire intelligence communications technologies. we need new thinking for a newera. we now have to unravel terrorist plots by finding a needle in a hey stake of global telecommunications. and meanwhile technology has given governments, including our own, unprecedented capability to m
stories based on the national security agency documents leaked by n.s.a. contractor edward snowden vowed today to publish new revelations about britain's espionage system. because british police detained his companion, david miranda, at london's heathrow airport and questioned him for nine hours. greenwald implied he knew many secrets about british intelligence and said authorities would regret detaining his partner. a cbs news correspondent john miller who is a former assistant director of the f.b.i. is on the case for us. john, what do you make of this? >> well, one question was did the brits do this on their own or were they acting on behalf of the united states and the white house acknowledged today that they were given advance word that this stop was going to happen. in another way, bob, it almost doesn't matter. you have to understand the way that u.s. intelligence and british intelligence work together. particularly the n.s.a. and their counterpart in great britain, the g.c.h.q. it's almost seamless. they have a morning conference call. they divide up the tarring hes, they work on
. it was another leak of stolen documents by former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden that revealed top secret telephone and internet surveillance programs. and today, the n.s.a. tried to clear the air by declassifying a secret court opinion showing how it unlawfully scooped up as many as 56,000 e-mails and other communications of people in the united states between 2008 and 2011. n.s.a. officials say the americans were not deliberately targeted. they say technical issues were to blame and new safeguards were put in place. we know more tonight about the gunman who terrorized an elementary school in decatur, georgia, yesterday-- michael brandon hill. fortunately, no one was injured. the 911 tapes were released today. on them, you will hear school bookkeeper antoinette tufs. here's mark strassmann. >> reporter: suspect michael brandon hill took this photo of himself holding what police believe is the same ak-47 that he sneaked in to the elementary school yesterday afternoon. in the main office, the 20-year- old confronted a school employee who called 911. you can hear hill giving orders to polic
at the national level with the nsa in some hot water again. a ruling from the secret court in 2011 came down on the nsa for collecting and storing thousands of emails from fellow americans. those messages were not related to terrorism. our political insider phil matier sat down with nate car doe so from the electronic frontier foundation. we asked him if the nsa was still reading our emails right now. >> so it's our understanding that, yes, there is a computer looking for the keywords. however, if it finds the keywords and an actual person reads it, if it doesn't, they are storing it any way for up to five years. >> so big brother is watching. we'll have extended interview on the online privacy debate sunday on kpix 5 this morning starting at 7:30 a.m. we hope you join us for that. >>> and your weekend starts in about 16 minutes, sir. >> we're not counting down, are we? >> no. it's friday! >>> we are getting ready for the weekend. we have some changes coming our way for the weekend. today is going to be a nice day although low clouds and fog slow to break up outside. you can see it hanging o
of the so-called black budget which was leaked by the fugitive former n.s.a. computer technician edward snowden. it shows that the budget in its entirety tops $52 billion a year with the biggest share-- more than $14 billion-- going to the c.i.a. our john miller is a former assistant deputy director of national intelligence. john, what did you find in terms of surprises in the budget? >> it was full of tantalizing facts-- some of which i knew because i used to go through this budget. but i think if you're going to pull out the special moments, one, there's the irony which is that the n.s.a. had a budget justification in there to look at 4,000 intelligence officers who they felt might be the insider threat. in other words, a potential security risk who might, i don't know, leak a document like edward snowden. so they certainly seem to have a point there. two, that the n.s.a. and c.i.a. were working on a large program jointly together about offensive cyber attacks against our adversaries since we hear a lot of discussion about cyber attacks against us. and, third, and probably most import
it's used by even nsa. but oracle is an legal battle with google accusing the search giant of using its language without its permission. i sat down with >> you know larry and sergey you have trouble with? >> larry specifically. >> larry -- i think -- >> larry per se. >> larry per se >> why? >> because he makes the decisions over there. he runs that company. no one else runs that company. and they decided -- let me be very clear. when you write a program, you write it. you use the oracle oracle/java tools for everything. up press a button and say convert this to android format. we don't compete with google. we just took our stock. that's a completely separate issue. >> but think they're evil. >> i think what they did was absolutely --. >> and you blame larry page. >> so larry page is evil -- that makes larry page evil? >> no i know his slogan is don't be evil. i think he slipped up this one time. >> he's a good time except for this one time when he -- >> this really bothers me. i don't see how he thinks you can just copy someone else's stuff. >> let's talk about stev
're going see happen is that there's going to be much more robust oversight over the n.s.a. there is failed oversight right now. and the fact that there is all this activity going on that we don't know about, and they spoon-feed to the intelligence committees of both houses what they want to tell them. and for any of us to say that we know what's going on in the n.s.a. i would find very suspect. i think we've got to provide whistle-blower protection to those who serve in the intelligence community so there is somewhere they can go to report misdeeds without being subject to criminal prosecution. >> schieffer: do you think that edward snowden was a whistle blower? he's being called everything from a whistle blow? he's being called everything from a traitor to a defector because he leaked some of this information. >> i think jury is still out on whether he's a trait oregon a whistle-blower. but i do think he has highlighted some extraordinary misdeeds and i do think that we've got to create an avenue so that persons within the military, if persons within the intelligence community and defense
's attack. >>> the national security agency has gathered more emails than previously disclosed. the nsa yesterday declassified three court rulings which showed the agency read as many as 56,000 emails from americans not connected to foreign terrorists. the nsa says it was an unintended consequence when it gathered bundles of internet traffic that was connected to terror suspects. the foreign intelligence surveillance court ordered the agency to find ways to limit what it collects and how long it keeps it. >>> day after bradley manning was sentenced for leaking classified information he is reportedly writing president obama now to ask for a pardon. he is telling news agencies he plans to live the rest of his life as a woman. manning's lawyer says the letter will explain why manning gave top secret documents to the website wikileaks. manning was sentenced yesterday to 35 years in prison. he will be eligible for parole in 7 years. >>> the city of san diego reached a tentative deal with bob filner the mayor who admitted to inappropriate behavior toward women. details are being kept private
secret documents. materials former nsa contractor edward snowden lake shore drive to the press. this after mounting pressure for the government to limit its surveillance of phone records. among the newly released documents the order that required verizon to turn over millions of phone records. today senators questioned top officials about the nsa's surveillance program. >> i believe based on what i have seen and i read intelligence regularly that we would place this nation in jeopardy if we eliminated these two programs. >> they argue the programs are crucial to national security and prevented terrorist attacks but opponents say the program crossed the line. >>> the president gave a pep talk to congressional democrats before they head home for the summer recess. cbs reporter tara mergener about his message on the economy and jobs. >>> reporter: president obama made the 1.6-mile trip down pennsylvania avenue to rally his democratic troops. he brought a simple message. >> jobs, middle class, broke. >> reporter: democrats asked the president for help in next year's midterm electio
: this photo shows edward snowden just before he got in a taxi and drove away from the moscow airport. the nsa leaker spent more than a month inside looking for a legal way out. thursday his attorney held up the documents granting snowden asylum in russia for one year. snowden's father told russian television he expected he's gratified. he'll listen to vladimir putin. he has stopped leaking. >> he's made a sacrifice. >> reporter: through the wikileaks website snowden thanking russia and said in the end the law is winning. the white house is furious and says russia should send snowden home to face trial. >> mr. snowden is not a whistle blower. he's accused of leaking classified information. >> reporter: the president held a white house meeting thursday with lawmakers concerned about the scope of the nsa surveillance program snowden exposed. some senators are pushing for new limits and oversight, but at the same time, want snowden brought to justice. >> i think the american people are capable of separating the illegal, completely intolerable actions of a law breaker like snowden. >> reporter: sn
for the "washington post," "time" magazine, the senior fellow at the carnegie sentry foundation, was on the n.s.a. snooping story very early on. david sanger chief washington correspondent for the "new york times." and rounding out the group our old pal john dickerson, our cbs news political director. so we have this threat. does this-- mark, you're the one who first broke this story about edward snowden-- does this change this debate on what the national security agency is doing? because, obviously, the reason we know about this threat is the capabilities at the national security agency. >> well, it's a reminder of the other side of the story, which is that we depend on intelligence. we depend on surveillance, and particularly, we depend on signals to keep the country safe. it doesn't change much about whether they've gone too far or whether we understand enough about the basic outlines of what they're doing that affects american privacy. >> schieffer: do you think-- i mean, because people always say this when something like this happens. people will say, "you don't suppose they're making more o
a summit with russian president vladimir putin payback for giving asylum to nsa leaker edward snowden. we'll have more on the strained relations. plus, u.s. drones take out more suspected terrorists in yemen as the government there claims it has stopped planned attacks by al qaeda. we'll have the latest tonight on the "cbs evening news." that's at 5:30 right after kpix 5 news. ,, ,, i want you to know stuff i want you to be kind. i want you to be smart. super smart. i want one thing in a doctor. to speak my language. i don't want you to look at the chart before you say hi...david. quiero que me hagas sentir segura. i want you to be awesome. that's the doctor i want. at kaiser permanente, we want you to choose the doctor that's right for you. find your perfect match at kp.org and thrive. i'm gonnhave to ask you to popower down your little word game. think your friends will understand. oh...no, it's actually my geico app.see? ...i just uh paid my bill. did you really? fr the plane? yeah, i can manage my policy, get roadside aistance, pretty much access geico 24/7. sounds a a little too good
putin, payback for giving asylum to n.s.a. leaker edward snowden. major garrett on the strained relations. u.s. drones take out more suspected terrorists in yemen as s e government there claims it has stopped planned attacks by al qaeda. bob orr has the latest. lalospora makes still more americans sick. dr. jon lapook reports the outbreak has exposed a gap in the technology needed to trace the source of dangerous diseases. and anthony mason with the man who had the right stuff to chronicle the civil rights movement. >> i was skinny, i was quick, i was fast. the cops couldn't catch me. . captioning sponsored by cbs captioning sponsored by this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> o'donnell: good evening. scott is on assignment, i'm irah o'donnell. it's not a return to the cold br, but there is a distinct still tonight in relations between the united states and russia. sesident obama today scrapped plans for a one-on-one meeting gith president putin in moscow mxt month. the white house cited a lack of progress on critical issues. but the last straw was putin's decision
to reform parts of those controversial nsa spying programs even though he says the spying is being done within the law. one change involves creating an independent attorney to challenge the government before the secret court that approves surveillance efforts. the president also wants more transparency overall. he plans to have an independent group of experts review the government's intelligence technologies and the president also voiced his opinion about nsa leaker edward snowden. >> i don't think mr. snowden was a patriot. as i said in my opening remarks, i called for a thorough review of our surveillance operations before mr. snowden made these leaks. my preference -- and i think the american people's preference -- would have been for a lawful orderly examination of these laws. >> on the same subject, we're learning top executives from bay area tech companies met with the president yesterday. representative from apple, google and at&t met at the white house to discuss their concerns about government surveillance and digital privacy. the tech companies are worried that information dem
arrested and could be charged with kidnapping and murder as early as today. >>> the father of nsa leaker edward snowden plans to visit his son in russia very soon. lon snowden hasn't talked to his son since he left the u.s. he wants to discuss a legal strategy to fight charges in this country. susan mcginnis reports. >> reporter: edward snowden's father wants his son to have his day in american court. >> where my son chooses to live the rest of his life will be his decision, but i would like at some point in time he should come back to the u.s. because i believe the truth will shine through. >> reporter: lon plans to meet his son in moscow to discuss ways to fight the espionage charges against the contractors. he's been granted asylum for one year. his father is not open to a plea deal. >> the only deal will be true justice. >> snowden is accused of leaking classified nsa information. his revelations have sparked debate about u.s. surveillance practices, and late last week president obama vowed to make the program more transparent and accountable. >> some steps to make americans more com
. the same area has had several accidents like this in recent years. >>> the father of former nsa contractor edward snowden says he has a visa now so he can visit his son in russia. as susan mcginnis reports, he wants to help his son fight the charges he faces back here in the u.s. >>> reporter: edward snowden's father wants his son to have his day in american court. >> where my son chooses to live is his decision but i would like him to be able to come back to the u.s. because i believe that the truth will shine through. >> reporter: lon snowden plans to meet his son in moscow to discuss ways to fight the charges against the former government contractor. the 30-year-old has been granted asylum in russia for one year. his father is not open to a plea deal. >> the only deal will be true justice. >> reporter: snowden is accused of leaking classified nsa information. his revelations have sparked debate about u.s. spying practice and late last week, president obama announced plans to make the programs more transparent and accountable. >> some steps to make americans more comfortable will actual
coverage than was previously disclosed. the "wall street journal" says the nsa keeps the content of some e-mails between u.s. citizens and also filters domestic phone calls made over the internet. the nsa can track almost anything that's online as long as it's covered by a broad court order. >>> egyptian authorities have arrested more top islamists, including the spokesperson for the muslim brotherhood, this after the organization's supreme leader was taken into custody. in washington, the obama administration may be nearing a decision on whether to cut some of its annual financial aid to egypt. administrators met at the white house yesterday. charlie d'agata reports. >> reporter: it was a humiliating defeat for the top leader of the muslim brotherhood. just hours after his arrest, mohammed badie was shown on egyptian tv looking tired and intimidated. he's charged with inciting violence after the fiery speeches he made in the muslim brotherhood's main protest camp. but it's the violence in the government's crackdown to clear protests that's brought international condemnation and calls for
. and you will hear what or cal ceo larry ellison told charlie rose about google and nsa spying. you're watching "cbs this morning saturday." so there i was again explaining my moderate to severe chronic plaque psoriasis to another new stylist. it was a total embarrassment. and not the kind of attention i wanted. so i had a serious talk with my dermatologist about my treatment options. this time, she prescribed humira-adalimumab. humira helps to clear the surface of my skin by actually working inside my body. in clinical trials, most adults with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis saw 75% skin clearance. and the majority of people were clear or almost clear in just 4 months. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal events, such as infections, lymphoma or other types of cancer have happened. blood, liver and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions and new or worsening heart failure have occurred. before starting humira, your doctor should test you for tb. ask your doctor if you live in or have been to a region whe
. >>> the fallout from the nsa scandal is growing this morning. the washington reported the agency broke privacy rules thousands of times since 2008. >> "the post" cited an internal audit and other top-secret documents reportedly obtained from former contractor edward snowden. on cbs "face the nation" sunday california congresswoman jackie spear said it revealed what she calls extraordinary misdeeds. >> there is failed oversight now. the fact there's all this active going on that we don't know about. they spoon feed to the intelligence committees of both houses what they want to tell them. for any of us to say that we know what's going on in the nsa i would find very suspect. >> our senior correspondent john miller served in the office of the director of national intelligence. he spoke with the nsa last night. welcome back, john, good morning. >> good to be back. >> good morning. >> is this failed oversight? what kind of oversight is it? >> this is very frustrating for the people of the nsa. because their view on this is that this is successful oversight. they said, you
the very people it's trying to protect. >> we stand for freedom. [ censored ] >> how the head of the nsa responded to a heckler when defending the government's spying. >> -- that i can tell you. >> how the bay area housing market is so hot, even a home with a very dark past sold way above asking. ,,,,,,,, >>> i think if somebody is carrying a hammer in his hand, it's pretty clear they are going to be vandalizing or doing something like that. >> now at 6:30, taking steps to take tools of violence out of the hands of protestors. oakland has been the go-to spot for violent protests but today, city officials are trying to stop the violence by banning weapons like hammers during demonstrations. kpix 535's da lin tells us business owners say it's about time. >>> reporter: many downtown business owners who are sick of being terrorized say it's about time the city took a harder approach. >> every time this happens, our business goes down for a few weeks or sometimes even longer. people are afraid to come down here. >> people are not here to protest. they are here to make troubles. and i think th
on the ground. >> public tips help find an attacker. new details on an nsa tool that tracks everything you do on the internet. >> i have multiple ways -- they have multiple ways to get all your information. >> president obama is expected to sign a bill that would bring down the interest rates on student loans. from across the bay to around the world, the stories that matter on "kpix 5 news this morning. captions by: caption colorado comments@captioncolorado.com >> your realtime captioner: linda marie macdonald. >>> good morning. it's thursday, august 1. good to have you on board. i'm frank mallicoat. >> i'm michelle griego. time now 6:00. let's get a quick look at the weather with lawrence. >> fog to start out the day not as much as yesterday. still clouds continue and they will thicken up throughout the morning hours. so numbers cooler than average against as we head into the afternoon. you see some of the clouds filling into the bay as we speak. most of the interior valleys are still clear. 46 santa rosa. 55 san jose. and 59 degrees in oakland. lots of sunshine away from the coast. 70s and
after nsa leaker edward snowden made it into russia. white house spokesman jay carney said president obama is extremely disappointed that russia approved his asylum request which is good for one year. his lawyers showed the government paperwork that allows his client to leave the moscow airport. snowden spent more than a month living there waiting for his papers. the u.s. has demanded that russia send snowden home to face prosecution for espionage. the president vladimir putin dismissed the request. >>> secretary of state john kerry is expected to resume high-level talks in pakistan today working on a security agreement that would allow american forces to stay in afghanistan beyond 2014. the move is to reassure the united states is not abandoning the region. no word on how many troops would remain but kerry says americans would train afghan forces and carry out commando raids against terrorist cells. >>> a kidnap victim stood up to her tormenter today in court. >> day turned into night, night turned into day. years turned into eternity. nobody should ever have to go through what i we
with president putin over russia's decision to grant asylum to nsa leaker edward snowden. plus, a new suspected american drone strike on al qaeda. >>> the surprising heart procedure for former president george w. bush. >>> the chef leading michelle obama's fight against childhood obesity. finally good news. >>> we begin this morning with a look at today's "eye opener," your world in 90 seconds. >>> this radical violent extremism is still out there. >> president obama warns the nation of a global terror threat. >> another possible drone strike in yemen overnight. >> strikes are an effort to disrupt an al qaeda terror plot. >> the g-20 summit is in st. petersburg. >> i will be going there. >> however, president obama canceling a meeting with vladimir putin. >> saying he was disappointed russia granted asylum to the nsa leaker. >> former president bush home from the hospital after a heart procedure. doctors inserted a stent to clear a blockage. >> senators graham and mccain during their visit to cairo urged both sides to start talking and stop fighting. >> days away
is working and what is not. >> over the man who started all of this, nsa leaker edward snowden. said despite the outward appearances, his relationship with vladimir putin isn't bad. >> she looking like the board kid in the back of the -- the bored kid in the back of the classroom. but the truth is when we are in conversations together, oftentimes it is very productive. >> reporter: president obama today condemned the new russian law criminalizing the public displays. >>> about half an hour ago, bart wrapped up talks after the governor gave them a 48- hourultimatum. if they cannot reach a deal, then they will request a 60-day cooling off period, which means no strike until october 10. so is there any chance that it could be over soon? kristen ayers talked to both sides. >> reporter: yeah, they both say to forget the cooling off period, but they want it figured out by sunday with very little progress at the bargaining table today and considering for the past two months and what it has looked like, it seems unlikely. >> from our standpoint, we want this thing to be done. nobody wants that to co
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